Tuesday, August 31, 2010

A Political Fable With A Truly Transparent Moral


Once upon a time in the Southern Kingdom of Carolina there was a princess named Nikki who wore nearly no clothes, for she believed the common people of the land wanted to see her for what she was.

Princess Nikki was fair of heart and well-liked by the king, and the commoners were enamored with the princess for, though they had never seen her, they all had heard the tales of the princess who wore nearly no clothes.

“A princess who wears nearly no clothes clearly has nothing to hide,” they would say, “we can trust a princess who wants us to see her for what she is.”

The legend of the princess grew and grew, spreading beyond the kingdom into other lands far and wide until everyone knew of the fair princess who wore nearly no clothes.

As it happened, the king’s reign was ending, and by tradition the common people were to choose among the princes, princesses, and commoners who should become the new ruler of the land.

The commoners of the Southern Kingdom of Carolina felt fortunate that the famous princess was in their kingdom. “We are the envy of all the neighboring lands who wish they had such a princess to lead them, for she wants us to see her for what she is.”

At long last the day of the great festival arrived where the commoners would gather and select their new ruler. All the subjects of the Southern Kingdom of Carolina crowded into the courtyard of the castle, anxious to finally meet Princess Nikki who wore nearly no clothes because she wanted the people to see her for what she was.

There was another aspiring leader at the festival, Prince Vincent, but there was little doubt that Princess Nikki would claim the throne.

It was a glorious day and spirits were high as the introductions began.

Prince Vincent was the first to appear on the stage. The people had heard tales of how popular he was among other princes and princesses but they wanted someone who had nothing to hide. “Why is he wearing clothes?” they asked each other. “He clearly does not want us to know him as he really is. He’s only wearing some clothes, but Princess Nikki wears nearly no clothes and that is the type of person we can trust, as she trusts us to see her as she really is.”

The gathered masses applauded Prince Vincent politely for they held no animosity towards him and though they thought he would likely be an able leader, he was certainly no Princess Nikki.

At long last a flourish of horns announced Princess Nikki, but as she took the stage the gathered masses gasped in unison.

“You cannot be Princess Nikki,” they cried, “Princess Nikki wears nearly no clothes and you are fully clothed.”

“I am Princess Nikki,” she replied, “and I indeed am wearing nearly no clothes because I have nothing to hide and I want you to see me for who I am.”

The good commoners of the Southern Kingdom of Carolina were confused. Though they wanted to believe Princess Nikki, she was not as they expected her to be.

“Princess,” a commoner in the crowed shouted “why you are wearing clothes over your torso?”

“The covering over my torso is not clothing,” Princess Nikki responded, “it is part of my royal privilege, afforded to princesses and princes alike though some choose not to display it. But I assure you I am wearing nearly no clothes because I have nothing to hide.”

“But you are wearing clothes over your arms,” another commoner insisted.

“The covering over my arms is not clothing, it is a gift from the king who has told me it is not clothing. As you know, I am wearing nearly no clothes because I want you to know me as I am.”

“But you are wearing clothes over your legs,” a third voice interjected.

“The covering over my legs is not clothing as you can surely see, it is merely a covering.”
“I have told you repeatedly that I wear nearly no clothing,” said Princess Nikki, “yet you continue to question me as to what I am wearing. All of you know who I am and you know I have nothing to hide, so why would you question the fact that I am wearing nearly no clothing?”

“I ask you, dear commoners of the Southern Kingdom of Carolina,” continued Princess Nikki, “do you believe what you know or are you fooled by what you see?”

Many of the people were content to continue believing what they knew to be true, that Princess Nikki wore nearly no clothing because she had nothing to hide.

And the rest of the people finally saw her for what she really was.

5 comments:

froggy said...

What would we do without South Carolina!
Hangeth in there.

Cubby said...

Fun fable.

R.J. said...

That was a good fable and I hope she loses. Badly.

Kyle said...

Bob, that was fun. Great way to tell a very real, sad story.

Bucko (a.k.a., Ken) said...

What an excellent fable :o)